Cheat Sheets for moms

Tips & Videos by Topic from Experts and Mamas
parenting challenges
recovery
breastfeeding
expert tips and videos on baby health
baby health
newborn
on-the-go
solids
Discovering your child has allergies

Food allergies can cause anxiety for some parents when introducing solids. Learn more about how Lauren discovered her son had allergies and the steps, advice, and resources she recommends for parents of children with suspected or confirmed allergies.

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    Pediatric Physical Therapy for Torticollis
    Torticollis in infants is when a baby’s neck muscles are tight on one side, typically a result of in utero positioning. Read how Deirdre spotted it in her baby and the advice and resources she recommends for other parents of babies with torticollis.
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    Weight fluctuations as a new mom
    Dealing with weight fluctuations is common for many people, especially moms as we go through pregnancy, postpartum, and juggling the many demands of motherhood.  Read Jordan's story as she dealt with the ups and downs of weight management throughout pregnancy and postpartum, the steps she took to overcome these challenges, and advice for parents dealing with similar issues.
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    When your child has recurrent croup
    Croup is a common respiratory illness of the trachea, larynx, and bronchi that can lead to inspiratory stridor and barking cough. Recurrent croup is when it happens more than twice in a year. Read Meredith's story when she discovered her daughter had recurrent croup and the steps, advice, and resources she recommends for parents.
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    When your infant child has RSV

    RSV is a common and contagious virus, especially among children. Most cases are similar to a cold and can be managed at home, but moderate and severe cases can require more intervention and can be scary for parents. Read Chelsea's story and the steps she took after discovering her six week old had RSV.

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      General recovery & pain management
      Physical recovery takes time, but there are also very concrete things you can do to help this process along and manage your pain. Read more for general tips, along with things you can do for specific common issues like constipation and hemorrhoids.
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      Mental health
      Postpartum mental health is a spectrum, not black-and-white “baby blues or PPD”, though it’s often presented that way. This means solutions go beyond “let it pass or see a psychiatrist”. There are many in-betweens, types of depression and anxiety disorders, and remedies. Just please don’t suffer alone or in silence.
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      Pelvic floor challenges
      Pelvic floor challenges such as incontinence, diastasis recti, painful sex, constipation, others are very common in the postpartum period. Your pelvic floor muscles weaken from the pressure of your growing uterus and baby in pregnancy as well as the pressure and tearing from vaginal delivery (or cesarean after an attempted vaginal delivery). Just because these issues are common doesn't mean you have to live with them.
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      Postpartum nutrition
      Postpartum nutrition is super important but often overlooked. Certain foods are more important than ever to nourish our bodies because they can help us recover faster and better, and they're not entirely the foods we might expect. Now is definitely not the time to diet, but it’s also not the time to gorge on junk food either. Science and centuries of collective cultural wisdom have taught us some great foods to help with postpartum recovery. The good news is there are lots of great options.
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      Recovery Timeline
      Everyone's recovery looks different but here is a general overview of what to expect week by week for the first 6 weeks and beyond.
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      Breastfeeding 101: Latch & Positioning
      It usually takes time and some instruction to get the hang of breastfeeding. You may often hear that getting a proper latch is fundamental to successful breastfeeding, but sometimes it can be hard to know if your baby is latched correctly. Read here for a step-by-step overview of the basics of a good breastfeeding session and tips for getting a good latch.
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      Breastmilk Storage
      It takes a lot of effort to pump/collect breastmilk – so make sure to store it right, but no need to overcomplicate it either. Here's a quick reference storage tips based on CDC guidelines to save or print & post on your fridge.
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      Clogged/Blocked Milk Ducts and Mastitis
      Clogged (also known as blocked or plugged) milk ducts can occur if breasts aren’t emptied regularly or completely, causing a small hard lump in the breast tissue that feels tender and swollen. It is usually more painful before feedings and can lead to an infection called mastitis if not addressed. Read for an overview and tips for clogged ducts and mastitis.
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      Engorgement
      Engorgement makes the breast feel hard, full, heavy, and possibly warm or tender. Some degree of engorgement is normal when milk "comes in" 2-5 days after birth. It usually goes away over the next few days as you breastfeed, though certain treatment steps can help.
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      Maintaining & Boosting Milk Supply
      Most moms know – or quickly learn – that the key to maintaining supply is to continue meeting baby's demand for milk. Sometimes, though, moms' milk supply decreases for a number of potential reasons, and this can be very stressful. Read here for tips on maintaining supply throughout your journey and for boosting it when you experience supply dips.
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      Milk Supply 101
      Read how milk supply actually works and tips for building supply in the early days and weeks.
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      Oversupply
      "How to build supply" gets much more attention, but oversupply can also be a challenge for moms. This is especially true in the early weeks when hormone shifts and cluster feeding can drive up your supply beyond what baby consumes. Read more for signs of oversupply and concrete tips for what to do about it.
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      Sore or Cracked Nipples
      Sore nipples are common during the first several days or even weeks of breastfeeding. Pain is often at its worst the first minute after baby latches on. A common cause is a shallow latch, while less common causes include tongue tie and inverted nipples. Sometimes, though, it’s because your nipples need time to adjust to breastfeeding. Read more for tips and indications that there's an underlying issue to resolve.
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      Colds & Congestion
      Colds are very common in babies as their immune systems fight off viruses and pollutants. They often last 7-10 days, which can feel like an eternity. Read here for what to do to ease the discomfort for your baby or toddler.
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      Constipation
      Detecting constipation can be confusing because baby poop changes a lot over time. Read here to understand what actual constipation looks like along with lots of practical tips for what to do about it.
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      Cradle cap
      Cradle cap is very common in young babies. You can recognize it as patches of yellow scales or crusts attached to a baby’s scalp, eyebrows, behind ears, armpits, diaper area, or skin folds. You can leave it to go away on its own if you’d like, but if you want to help it clear sooner read on for what to do.
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      Dental care for babies & toddlers
      Babies, and especially toddlers, can be very resistent and squirmy when it comes to brushing their teeth. It's normal. Don't let it stress you out or discourage you from brushing. Just keep at it! Your goal is to start building good dental hygiene habits by getting your baby comfortable with the toothbrush and establishing a routine.
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      Eczema and rashes
      Rashes of all types are very common in babies and young children, especially eczema, diaper rashes, drool rashes, and heat rashes. Here's a clear rundown on what to do for each type.
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      Fever
      Fevers in young babies can be very scary for parents. Read here for the rundown on fevers and what you should do at each age. 
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      Gas
      Young babies sometimes get “gassy”, which is when air is trapped in their digestive tract. This is uncomfortable and can make them fussy. Read here for common signs of gassiness along with a set of things you can do to offer some relief.
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      Reflux
      Simply put, reflux is when your baby spits up breastmilk or formula. Most babies have some degree of reflux. For most, it's a harmless issue that they just need to outgrow. More severe cases, though, can be stressful for both baby and parents. Read here for concrete tips on how to manage reflux and signals for when it's best to call the pediatrician.
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      Teething pain
      Teething is when a baby has a tooth come through the gums, which can be uncomfortable for your baby, especially the few days before the tooth busts through. Read for tips on helping your baby through tough teething periods.
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      Calming a fussy baby
      There are few things more stressful than a very fussy baby that won't stop crying. The most common reason babies get fussy is because they're overtired. But when babies are overtired, it can be even harder for them to fall asleep. It's a cruel, vicious sycle, but here are some tips.
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      Pacifier Usage Tips
      Pacifiers: to use or not to use? This question unfortunately comes with some controversy, like lots of parenting decisions in the 21st century. If you choose not to use a pacifier, that is totally fine! If you do choose to use one, that is also fine, and you're in good company; 75-85% of babies in Western countries use a pacifier at least some of the time. Read on for the latest evidence and tips on pacifier usage.
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      Skin-to-skin contact
      The benefits of skin-to-skin contact are widely acknowledged. Skin-to-skin care (SSC) is when a naked or diapered baby is laid on mom or dad's bare chest so that frontal body contact is skin-to-skin. Read on for how to do skin-to-skin and how it benefits babies and parents.
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      Tummy time
      Tummy time is important for your baby as you'll probably hear a lot, but there's no need to overcomplicate it either. Here's what you need to know.
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      Flying with a baby or toddler
      Flying with a baby is work! A bit of planning ahead and having the right mindset can make it more manageable. Read on for tips, checklists, and answers to FAQs on plane travel with little ones.
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      General tips & prep for traveling with a baby
      Traveling away from home with your baby can be fun and at the same time it can be hard. The key to making it as pleasant as possible is mindset. Read on for 3 of the most important basic principles to set yourself up for a positive travel experience.
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      Long car rides with a baby or toddler
      Long car rides are tougher with babies, but they're often unavoidable. Just make sure to travel safely, pack the night before to make travel day less stressful, and be prepared to the trip to take longer than it would otherwise. Read on for tips and checklists.
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      Packing Lists for Traveling with a Baby: Basic Checklist
      Traveling both near and far with a baby or toddler can mean packing lots of stuff, and it's easy to forget things. Here are base packing checklists for you to customize however you decide!
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      Packing Lists for Traveling with a Baby: Sun and Snow Checklists
      Here are packing lists for your baby or toddler to help you get organized before taking that well-deserved trip to the mountains or the beach!
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      Choking Hazards and Safety Tips for Babies & Toddlers
      Simply put, choking hazards are objects that block a child's airway. The most concerning foods are hard, small, round and slippery, and/or sticky. Most foods can be adapted to be safe for babies, but there are some that are best avoided altogether until children are older.
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      Food allergies
      Food allergies can cause anxiety for some parents when introducing solids. Allergies only affect a small minority of children, but are common enough that it's important to know about them and what to do if your child has a reaction.
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      How to Start Solids: Spoon-feeding, baby-led weaning, & key principles
      Which method to use for introducing solids to your baby? The answer is: it's up to YOU! You may come across a parenting debate today around what the "best" way to start solids is, often framed as "purees versus baby-led weaning (BLW)". Read on for why this is not the most useful framing and how to decide what's right for your baby.
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      Nutrition Tips for Babies and Toddlers
      Breastmilk or formula is the primary source of calories and nutrients during baby's first year, with solid foods complementary; this ratio gradually shifts over months 6-12. Read on for nutrition-related guidelines particularly relevant for babies' and toddlers' developing bodies and brains as they transition to solids.
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      Solids Progression: 6-12 months
      From the time your baby starts solids around 6 months until their first birthday, it's best to progress gradually from small amounts of simple foods once a day toward a consistent three "complete" meals daily plus snacks. Here is a guide for roughly how this progression looks for many families.
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      When & why to start solids
      When should your baby start solids? If milk is the main source of nutrition for the first year, why even bother with solids until later? Read on for evidence-based guidance on when and why to introduce solids to your baby.
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